If you want lasting happiness...look for it in those things that last.

November 8, 2017

It’s been awhile since I have blogged! To say that this past year has been incredible, would be an understatement. I started my own business after retiring from my 25-year career, traveled for 16 days to Vietnam and Cambodia on a spiritual journey, became a meditation teacher, have been working with clients as a life and holistic coach, as well as picking up a couple of corporate clients, most recently the National Wellness Institute, providing expertise regarding health and wellness – and I am not done!

 

I just returned from a six-day yoga and meditation retreat at the Chopra Center for Wellbeing. I have had several life-changing moments over the last year, and all of the moments during those six days at the retreat also culminated into tremendous insight, strength, courage, awareness and consciousness. It was tremendous, and although I can assign all of those words to the six days, it really was an experience that transcends language. It really was more of an energetic shift inside.

 

There were so many takeaways from that experience, and one that seems so pronounced and prevalent in today’s world was one little quote by Raghavanand, a Vedic Educator who studied under Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. He said, “If we want lasting happiness, look for it in those things that last…”  Whoa.  That reminded me that happiness is indeed, fleeting. I believe that’s why in the Declaration of Independence it states “Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness”.

 

Happiness in life is not a guarantee, and in fact, the pursuit of happiness can be like trying to keep frogs in wheelbarrow! Just visualize that! You get all of your happy frogs in the wheelbarrow and one by one, they start jumping out to escape. It’s a constant pursuit of getting it, losing it, and running after it. And the pursuit starts all over again.

 

Now don’t get me wrong.  Happiness is wonderful! We feel that way when we get married (or divorced), when we get the promotion at the job, when we score a great deal on that handbag we wanted, when we eat our favorite dessert. Yet all of these happy moments are temporary. They come and go, just like the tide ebbs and flows.  So what did Raghavanand mean when he said “look for it in those things that last...”

 

My experience with that statement is profound. I absolutely have lived my life placing my happiness in those things that wouldn’t last. Things commonly referred to as “positions and possessions”.  Titles and positions I have held, shoes and handbags I have owned, homes, art work, stuff…. Lots and lots of stuff.  All of those are temporary. Positions end, shoes wear out, stuff gets old and then you want new stuff (who can relate?). There was never any lasting happiness in those things.

 

In this past year, after loosing my mother, retiring from a 25 year career, self-inquiry, travel, growth and lots of love, I have found that the things that last are the memories – the memories of laughing with loved ones, of traveling and exploring of loving and being loved. I have found that exploration of self, deep connection to a higher power and to others, purrs from my cat, watching the sunset, listening to the waves crash and the birds sing, that is where I find my lasting happiness – and in fact it’s even deeper than happiness, which is fleeting. It has become my joy.

 

So, take a few moments and think about your life. Where do you find your deep, meaningful lasting happiness? In the smiles of your children? Holding your partners hand? Playing fetch with your dog? Those are the places that touch our soul and bring us joy. Those are the places where time stands still, and we can sit in gratitude for all we have.  Find your lasting happiness and do more of it.

 

Namaste,

Nikki

 

For Life and Holistic Coaching Services, contact Nikki at coaching@nikkibuckstead.com or 714-880-4314. Sessions conducted in person (if local) or online via Zoom.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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